On the precipice of life and the greater good

22nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from in the noisy confusion of life with 75,416 notes

elpolloloc:

i will always love this.

elpolloloc:

i will always love this.

Source: elpolloloc

22nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from in the noisy confusion of life with 32,393 notes

Source: clarieholt

22nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from The Paper Garden with 16,228 notes

natgeotravel:

Reflections: A young boy casts a striking comparison to an aging man lost in a book on a ferry in Istanbul. 
Photograph by Merve Ates, National Geographic Your Shot

natgeotravel:

Reflections: A young boy casts a striking comparison to an aging man lost in a book on a ferry in Istanbul. 

Photograph by Merve Ates, National Geographic Your Shot

Source: National Geographic

6th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from in the noisy confusion of life with 454,491 notes

catherinebythackeray:

Well

tears

Source: sizvideos

30th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from With me you'll experience terrible wonders with 25,472 notes

Figures dancing gracefully

Across my memory

Source: gingermalarkey

14th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from in the noisy confusion of life with 185,854 notes

coralblue-number3:

reverseracism:

myintrovertedmind:

« The Real Africa : Fight The Stereotype » by Thiri Mariah Boucher

P.R.E.A.C.H.

I personally love this.

Someone finally said it. People act like Africa is one big country with one race. 

Source: myintrovertedmind

1st July 2014

Photo reblogged from PBS NewsHour with 15,450 notes

newshour:

The Navy just pinned its first female four-star admiral.
Vice Admiral Michelle Howard is now the first female four-star admiral in the Navy’s 236-year history.

newshour:

The Navy just pinned its first female four-star admiral.

Vice Admiral Michelle Howard is now the first female four-star admiral in the Navy’s 236-year history.

26th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Newsweek with 946 notes

artforbabies:

Skull with a Burning Cigarette - Vincent Van Gogh
1885–1886, oil on canvas

artforbabies:

Skull with a Burning Cigarette - Vincent Van Gogh

1885–1886, oil on canvas

Source: artforbabies

25th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Newsweek with 100 notes

newsweek:

Lance Corporal Victor Lu’s friends in his Marine unit—the 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment, part of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force that fought in the brutal battle to retake the Iraqi city of Fallujah from insurgents in late 2004—used to call him “Buddha.” The young Vietnamese-American man was 6 feet 3 inches tall, a black belt in Ju Si Tang Chinese kung fu and among the physically strongest men in his unit. But the imposing strength and physique belied a gentle, affable nature. Hence the nickname, which Lu liked so much he scribbled it onto the back of his Kevlar vest.
He had grown up in Los Angeles, not far from the University of Southern California, the eldest son of six children born to Nu and Xuong Lu, his mother and father. His parents had fled the country in the wake of the 1975 American withdrawal—and Communist takeover—of that country. Roughly 800,000 Vietnamese left the country from 1975 to 1995, with more than half of them settling in the United States.
Like many other young Americans, he had enlisted in the Marines after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and hoped, after the war, to join the Los Angeles Police Department. Before he went back for his second tour—before the assault on Fallujah—he told a friend he believed deeply in the mission. “We are bringing freedom,” he said, “to people who deserve it.”
He would not return from Iraq alive. In the early morning of November 13, 2004, the “3-5” was going house to house in Fallujah. When one front door jammed, Lu’s fellow Marines called on him to use his bulk and strength as a battering ram. He rammed his shoulder into the door, it popped open, and almost immediately Lu began taking fire from three insurgents inside. He absorbed eight or nine rounds before his unit mates could return fire. He slumped to the floor, mortally wounded. He was 22 years old.
Vietnam and Iraq Now Inextricably Linked as U.S. Geopolitical Disasters

newsweek:

Lance Corporal Victor Lu’s friends in his Marine unit—the 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment, part of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force that fought in the brutal battle to retake the Iraqi city of Fallujah from insurgents in late 2004—used to call him “Buddha.” The young Vietnamese-American man was 6 feet 3 inches tall, a black belt in Ju Si Tang Chinese kung fu and among the physically strongest men in his unit. But the imposing strength and physique belied a gentle, affable nature. Hence the nickname, which Lu liked so much he scribbled it onto the back of his Kevlar vest.

He had grown up in Los Angeles, not far from the University of Southern California, the eldest son of six children born to Nu and Xuong Lu, his mother and father. His parents had fled the country in the wake of the 1975 American withdrawal—and Communist takeover—of that country. Roughly 800,000 Vietnamese left the country from 1975 to 1995, with more than half of them settling in the United States.

Like many other young Americans, he had enlisted in the Marines after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and hoped, after the war, to join the Los Angeles Police Department. Before he went back for his second tour—before the assault on Fallujah—he told a friend he believed deeply in the mission. “We are bringing freedom,” he said, “to people who deserve it.”

He would not return from Iraq alive. In the early morning of November 13, 2004, the “3-5” was going house to house in Fallujah. When one front door jammed, Lu’s fellow Marines called on him to use his bulk and strength as a battering ram. He rammed his shoulder into the door, it popped open, and almost immediately Lu began taking fire from three insurgents inside. He absorbed eight or nine rounds before his unit mates could return fire. He slumped to the floor, mortally wounded. He was 22 years old.

Vietnam and Iraq Now Inextricably Linked as U.S. Geopolitical Disasters

25th June 2014

Photo reblogged from NPR with 537 notes

nprbooks:

What’s black and white all over? The trailer for The Giver! Finally!
Back in March, the film’s publicity department mistakenly released the film’s first trailer in color — which, in case you aren’t familiar with Lois Lowry’s famous novel, doesn’t stay true to the story about a dystopian society that can’t see in color. Director Phillip Noyce told HuffPost Entertainment, “It was an error. It doesn’t reflect our interpretation of the novel. It doesn’t reflect the movie.”
They finally got it right in the film’s second trailer, which premiered earlier this month.
And speaking of The Giver, have you seen our Book Your Trip summer reading recommendations yet? Lowry’s classic is featured on the bike list alongside The Motorcycle Diaries and The Mouse and the Motorcycle. (Please, please, Noyce, don’t let them take out the bicycle too …)
-Intern Cara

nprbooks:

What’s black and white all over? The trailer for The Giver! Finally!

Back in March, the film’s publicity department mistakenly released the film’s first trailer in color — which, in case you aren’t familiar with Lois Lowry’s famous novel, doesn’t stay true to the story about a dystopian society that can’t see in color. Director Phillip Noyce told HuffPost Entertainment, “It was an error. It doesn’t reflect our interpretation of the novel. It doesn’t reflect the movie.

They finally got it right in the film’s second trailer, which premiered earlier this month.

And speaking of The Giver, have you seen our Book Your Trip summer reading recommendations yet? Lowry’s classic is featured on the bike list alongside The Motorcycle Diaries and The Mouse and the Motorcycle. (Please, please, Noyce, don’t let them take out the bicycle too …)

-Intern Cara

Source: nprbooks